Eddy and Sam's Griffons
Wirehaired Pointing Griffons
High Quality Hunting Dogs and Devoted Family Companions
Wirehaired Griffon Breed Traits
The Griffon’s easy trainability, devotion to family, and friendly temperament endear him to all. He thrives on human companionship and prefers to be a house dog. The breed’s wiry coat will not develop fully until the dog is about 2-3 years old. The coat is maintained with regular brushing and stripping. This sporting dog needs plenty of exercise to keep it physically and mentally fit.

Griffon History

Griffon-like dogs have existed throughout history, but exact origins are uncertain. The modern history of the breed, however, has been well documented. Dutchman Eduard Korthals was an avid hunter and desired a dog that could hunt over a variety of terrain, so he developed a breeding program to create a versatile new sporting breed. In less than two decades, Korthals had fixed the new breed he called the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, wrote the standard and formed a Griffon club.
"He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart"

Wirehaired Griffon Versatility

Medium sized and bred to cover all terrain encountered by the walking hunter, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon has been called the "4-wheel drive of hunting dogs" as he will enter briars or underbrush without hesitation. Griffons excel equally as pointers in the field and as retrievers in the water. Their coarse double coat protects them in rough cover and gives them an unkempt appearance. The coat can be a variety of colors, most often steel gray with brown markings.

Low-shedding, easy keepers; the famous wire coat requires occasional professional grooming.

The Griffon's easy trainability, devotion to family, and friendly temperament endear him to all. He thrives on human companionship and prefers to be house dog. The breed's wiry coat will not develop fully until the dog is about 2-3 years old and is maintained with regular brushing and stripping. This sporting dog needs plenty of exercise to keep it physically and mentally fit.
Nutrition & Feeding
Depending on the size of your dog as an adult you are going to want to feed them a formula that will cater to their unique digestive needs through the various phases of their life. Many dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for small, medium, large and giant breeds.​​
The Griffon is a large breed and has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. What you feed your dog is an individual choice, but working with your veterinarian and/or breeder will be the best way to determine frequency of meals as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase his longevity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Coat & Grooming

The breed's wiry coat will not develop fully until the dog is about 2-3 years old and is maintained with regular brushing and stripping. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Energy & Exercise

You can’t blame the French and Dutch for squabbling over the credit for a breed that has built a worldwide reputation as an incomparable hunter and a sweet, sagacious house dog. These are athletic dogs of great stamina, willing and able to join any kind of outdoorsy family fun on land or lake—they didn't earn the nickname “Supreme Gundog” by lying on the couch scarfing down Snausages. Griffs are affectionate family dogs who train easily and thrive on lots of love and exercise.